A lot of snow

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We just got back to Abisko Scientific Research station after our initial field trip of the season.

The late spring up here has resulted in a lot of snow and still frozen ground on our sites. Creative thinking, nice weather and a good field team still made the fieldwork successful.

/ Mats P. Björkman – the Alpine & Polar Ecology group of BLUES

Annonser

Rain, snow and a bit of sun.

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We are now on our way back after 10 days in the surroundings of Abisko. The final fieldwork for this season provided a variety of weather including rain, snow, hail, a bit of sun and northern lights. We managed to collect all the shrubs needed for Christopher Leifsson’s MSc thesis, took the last flux measurements for Karolin Gunnarsson’s BSc thesis and collected about 90 kg of soil for future incubation and biomarker analysis. However, no permafrost was detected at the Goaivojavri where we thought we would find some…

Jonas Stenström from Untamedscience was a pleasant company (although it took a while to get used to all his cameras…) and soon there will be a movie from the field campaign.

Enjoy the pictures above.

– the Alpine and Polar Ecology group of BLUES

Last fieldwork for the season.

Preparing for the last PERMTHAW fieldwork this season. However, we are already somewhat delayed in Abisko, waiting for equipment that was sent as “express”. Normal snail-mail would probably have been faster up here in the north. Hopefully we fly out tomorrow.

On our schedule this time: Flux measurements of greenhouse gases, Shrub collection for dendrochronology and Soil sampling for incubations and microbial analysis.

With us this time is also movie-maker Jonas Stenström from Untamedscience with all his cameras and a drone for upcoming outreach activities.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

– the Alpine and Polar Ecology group of BLUES

Dendrochronology?! On that?????

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Well, rather Shrubochronology!

MSc student Christopher Leifsson will use dendrochronological methods on shrubs like the dwarf birch (betula nana) in the picture to detect permafrost degradation in sub-Arctic Sweden in collaboration with the PERMTHAW project. So far 65 dwarf birches has been collected and more are to come during our next field visit in early September.

– the Alpine and Polar Ecology group of BLUES